How To Reduce TTFB In WordPress

Learn How To Reduce TTFB In WordPress, the toughest thing to improve in WordPress is TTFB, or Time to First Byte. This guide will help you incorporate some simple steps to improve TTFB.

What is TTFB?

TTFB, which stands for time to first byte, is the amount of time it takes to retrieve the first byte of data from the web server when a client makes an HTTP request to it. TTFB is an important aspect of website optimization because the faster the TTFB is supplied to the user the faster the requested resource can start.


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The first Byte time consists of three different components.

The time required to send the HTTP request The time needed for the server to process the request The time needed for the server to send back the first byte of the response to the client The TTFB can be visualized for a specific resource using a site like WebPageTest. After running https:/keithrainz.me through the check, for example, we can see that the TTFB for the initial HTML document took 161 ms.

To put it simply, this is a measure of how long a client has to wait before the server receives its first byte of data. The longer it takes to get the data, the longer it takes for your page to show up. A common misconception is that this is measured after DNS lookup times, but in networking, the initial TTFB measurement also involves network latency. It requires a 3-step phase, and there may be delays and latency somewhere in between, adding up to your total TTFB.

What is a good TTFB in WordPress?

The time to first byte will differ considerably depending on what type of content you serve (static vs dynamic), the configuration of your server, etc. The determination of what is a good TTFB number is therefore difficult to answer and variable depending on your situation. Everything with a TTFB below 100 ms is great on average though. Anything between 200-500 ms is normal, between 500 ms-1 s is less than optimal and anything larger than 1 s will generally be further investigated.

It should be noted, as stated, that these times are average averages but do not apply to all websites. It may be absolutely unavoidable, depending on the type of content and the nature of the query, that the TTFB is larger than 1 second.

How to improve your TTFB

Understanding which areas to develop for optimizing your TTFB is certainly quite critical. The next segment discusses a number of actionable things to be remembered when working towards increasing your first byte time.

In the complex content environment, in order to create a website, several processes and interactions have to be carried out. Such interactions take time, and will raise your TTFB accordingly. Implementing a caching function can help to reduce the drawbacks of load time, since it holds a cached copy of a previously requested pre-built page.


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The well-known WordPress CMS has lots of caching content plug-in options.
Being aware of the TTFB of your website, and how to reduce it as much as possible, is a big move forward in maximizing the page speed of your website. Keeping up to date with the new releases of software, checking the load ability of your web server and introducing a caching system are a few ways to keep your time for first byte in check.

Estimate Cost : 30 USD

Time Needed : 24 days 11 hours 00 minutes

How To Reduce TTFB In WordPress

  1. You can Use a Cache Plugin

    WordPress has to execute PHP and MySQL queries for any new request to a domain. But you don't need it 90 per cent of the time. You can create and support the HTML files directly. Compared to generating it from PHP it is very fast.
    There are several plugins that help you allow cache in WordPress. A caching plugin that creates your website's static HTML pages and saves them to your server. Your caching plugin serves the lighter HTML page every time a user wants to access your website, instead of processing the comparatively heavier WordPress PHP files. Visitors to your website will have to update your web pages any time they visit your site without any caching at all. … You can allow the different forms of server-side caching available with caching plugins, such as page caching and object caching.WordPress has to execute PHP and MySQL queries for any new request to a domain. But you don't need it 90 per cent of the time. You can create and support the HTML files directly. Compared to generating it from PHP it is very fast.  There are several plugins that help you allow cache in WordPress. A caching plugin that creates your website's static HTML pages and saves them to your server. Your caching plugin serves the lighter HTML page every time a user wants to access your website, instead of processing the comparatively heavier WordPress PHP files. Visitors to your website will have to update your web pages any time they visit your site without any caching at all. ... You can allow the different forms of server-side caching available with caching plugins, such as page caching and object caching.

  2. Use cloud hosting or managed WordPress hosting

    Managed WordPress hosting is a concierge program, where the host handles all the technical aspects of running WordPress. This includes security, speed, updates to WordPress, regular backups, uptime to the website and scalability. … One of the best things about WordPress Managed hosting is the premium service. Rather of storing all of the data on a single computer, cloud computing spreads the data over a variety of different computers, various servers, all wired together in different locations. You manage your data through a “virtual machine” which accesses all the different servers in the “cloud.”Use cloud hosting or managed WordPress hosting

  3. Use the latest version of PHP on WordPress

    Yeah, well. We're talking a lot about pace but it's a critical factor for any good website. You could have the world's best company, the nicest website. Yet if it gradually loads, nobody can buy your product or stay on your website.
    If you run either PHP 5.6, PHP 7.0, or PHP 7.1, do you know your website isn't being protected?
    Okay, all of those variants of PHP are what's known as EOL or end of life. That means they don't get any updates, be it for protection or bug fixes.
    You are potentially putting the website in risk by using an outdated version of PHP. Even those running PHP 7.2 risk losing support early.
    Although we're not suggesting you're going to be compromised if you're using an older version of PHP, this definitely plays into the third-party's nefarious hands. Keep it safe and update to 7.3 PHP or 7.4 PHP.
    Maintaining. Which happens when PHP comes up with a bug? Well, at some stage what happens in most cases is, the bug is patched, and web hosting companies simply add the patch to their servers and you never even know.
    Yet … what about the bugs when EOL is a PHP version? Yeah, you are out of luck sadly! The only way you can remedy that is to update to a newer version of PHP.

    Upgrading when not important (e.g., the website is not broken) is much easier, because the update is not completed in a rush, so you have more time to check it out.

    But having to update to the version you are currently using is not ideal at all, because there is a problem.
    Greater compatibility with modern applications For older versions of PHP we are already seeing WordPress plugins such as MailPoet move to falling support within their application.

    If you are attempting to use MailPoet with PHP 5.6, you will only see an error message asking you to update.
    And this is a trend that will continue as newer versions of PHP add new features and enhancements that developers choose to integrate within their applications, and sometimes have to drop support for older versions of PHP to do so.
    WooCommerce's new version had also removed support for PHP 5.6. While as an end-user, you can find it hard to avoid working with older PHP versions of your applications, developers are still doing so with their best interests at heart.Yeah, well. We're talking a lot about pace but it's a critical factor for any good website. You could have the world's best company, the nicest website. Yet if it gradually loads, nobody can buy your product or stay on your website. If you run either PHP 5.6, PHP 7.0, or PHP 7.1, do you know your website isn't being protected?  Okay, all of those variants of PHP are what's known as EOL or end of life. That means they don't get any updates, be it for protection or bug fixes.  You are potentially putting the website in risk by using an outdated version of PHP. Even those running PHP 7.2 risk losing support early.  Although we're not suggesting you're going to be compromised if you're using an older version of PHP, this definitely plays into the third-party's nefarious hands. Keep it safe and update to 7.3 PHP or 7.4 PHP. Maintaining. Which happens when PHP comes up with a bug? Well, at some stage what happens in most cases is, the bug is patched, and web hosting companies simply add the patch to their servers and you never even know.  Yet ... what about the bugs when EOL is a PHP version? Yeah, you are out of luck sadly! The only way you can remedy that is to update to a newer version of PHP.  Upgrading when not important (e.g., the website is not broken) is much easier, because the update is not completed in a rush, so you have more time to check it out.  But having to update to the version you are currently using is not ideal at all, because there is a problem.  Greater compatibility with modern applications For older versions of PHP we are already seeing WordPress plugins such as MailPoet move to falling support within their application.  If you are attempting to use MailPoet with PHP 5.6, you will only see an error message asking you to update.  And this is a trend that will continue as newer versions of PHP add new features and enhancements that developers choose to integrate within their applications, and sometimes have to drop support for older versions of PHP to do so.  WooCommerce's new version had also removed support for PHP 5.6. While as an end-user, you can find it hard to avoid working with older PHP versions of your applications, developers are still doing so with their best interests at heart.

  4. Cache your site by using cache plugins

    Caching is a complex technology that really does one simple thing: make your website very easy. And speed is key to your site's success, since people don't want to wait around to load web pages. In reality, a study by CDN service Akamai found that 47 per cent of people expect to load a web page in 2 seconds or less, and 40 per cent would leave a page that takes longer than 3 seconds to load.
    So, you'd think websites shrink in file size in response, right? Not that. The typical Web page today allows users to download data worth 2.2 MB compared to just 702 KB in 2010. That is an rise in size of 317 per cent due to items like photos, videos, scripts and fonts.

    Luckily, you can load your site faster by downloading a caching plugin-extra files and all. I'll cover what caching is in this article and describe the different types of caching, but mostly concentrate on caching plugins and why you need to install an ASAP if you haven't already done so.
    Caching is the method of temporarily storing frequently-accessed data in a cache. Let's first look at what happens when you don't use caching to clarify it properly: When someone visits a page on your site, they need to request information from your web host. These requests include HTML and PHP files, scripts, images, fonts, etc. In addition, the user also has to get information from what's stored in your WordPress folder, such as posts and articles.

    Essentially, this is what happens: a visitor will land on your website and their client will contact your web server Your WordPress application will retrieve information such as your posts and other data from your database The web server will then compile this data into an HTML page and serve it to the user.
    To start using one, take a look at the above listed plugins, read more feedback, do your research and set up one on your web. Do not forget to test the pace of your application, so you can compare results. Only then can you decide which plugin to cache fits best for the setup.WordPress has to execute PHP and MySQL queries for any new request to a domain. But you don't need it 90 per cent of the time. You can create and support the HTML files directly. Compared to generating it from PHP it is very fast. There are several plugins that help you allow cache in WordPress. A caching plugin that creates your website's static HTML pages and saves them to your server. Your caching plugin serves the lighter HTML page every time a user wants to access your website, instead of processing the comparatively heavier WordPress PHP files. Visitors to your website will have to update your web pages any time they visit your site without any caching at all. ... You can allow the different forms of server-side caching available with caching plugins, such as page caching and object caching.

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